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African Wildlife Photography Blog



On my 'From the Field' page, I offer a formal type of African photography blog. Working as a professional African wildlife photographer, I share my latest African wildlife photography images, as well as wildlife photography tips. I also share my latest fine art nature photography and fine art wildlife photography collections...


African Wildlife Photography
and an African Photography Blog:





Chimps are our closest living relatives sharing surprisingly 98.8% of our DNA. On a recent photographic shoot to photograph the largest population of wild chimps left on the planet, my specific intention was to try and capture photographs that epitomize the close genetic relationship that exists between humans and chimps…

See a striking resemblance to yourself here...

On a recent photographic safari to the Serengeti, I discovered that migrating wildebeest have more to worry about than just lions and river crossings.

See a wildebeest with a broken leg about to be engulfed here...

Is there anything better than lying in your bed deep in the African bush and hearing the resonating roar of a lion? If you have had the privilege of going on safari and hearing the king of the jungle bellow forth, which incidentally sounds absolutely nothing like the pathetic roar you see in the logo of an infamous production company, then you will no doubt share my sentiments.

Read more about the Dawn King here...

The power of a still photograph lies in its ability to arrest a single moment in time...

See the last breath here...

Africa is such an incredibly diverse continent! Not only do we have a very unique set of large mammalian species like Giraffe, Zebra and Elephant but the continent is also blessed with an incredible array of primates. Mountain Gorillas and Chimpanzees definitely seem to steal the show but high up in the Simien Mountains of Ethiopia, one finds a very unique and bizarre species of primate.


Meet the Gelada here...


It was ten years ago that I first laid eyes upon the great wildebeest migration on the grassy plains of Kenya’s Masai Mara. This is one of the last great mammal migrations left on our planet and I have photographed it every year since. Unbeknownst to me however, is that the largest mammal migration in the world and one that is four times the size of the wildebeest migration, also occurs on the African continent. This year, for the very first time, I went to check it out.

Read all about the Bat Blizzard here...


One particularly very wet February in Tanzania’s Ruaha National Park, I could not drive anywhere without getting stuck and when I mean anywhere, I mean I was marooned in our camp! With not many options available to me, instead of using wheels as my modus operandi, I took to walking around the camp with my close-focusing macro lens in hand.

Read about my macro meandering here...


 As a wildlife photographer, I am also a storyteller and along my photographic journey, I have moved away from simply wanting to document my subjects. I now want to create images that in some way convey at least a part of the mystery, fascination, wonder and intrigue I feel for them. The problem is, this is far easier done with certain subjects than it is with others.

Read about my pursuit of the Elephant X-factor here...




 

The Kalahari desert is for me a strange place! I have heard from many of my South African photographic contemporaries that this is undoubtedly their favourite photographic haunt and so it is always with great expectation that I set out to explore this little known corner of Africa. Every time I arrive in the Kalagadi however, I have to say that I feel beyond disappointed, more like disillusioned.


Read more here...


I have always felt that I was born too late! Too late for what you ask? Well, too late to see and experience the Africa of my dreams. I regularly daydream about what Africa was once like. I have gone in search of Livingstone's Africa and I have found pockets of it left.

Read more here...

 

This splendid mountain escarpment is home to huge birds of prey and draws photographers from afar, all seeking their own shot of a Bearded or Cape Vulture in flight. At the Giant’s Castle bird hide I decided however, that I wanted to capture the smaller inhabitants of the uKhahlamba as well…


Read more here...



I have to be honest and say that I am not a lover of reptiles, nor am I one of those crazy bushwhacked safari guides who actively launch themselves into contact with reptiles, risking both life and limb (ala Albie Venter)! So how did I come to obtain this close-up image of a crocodile then?


Read more here...


 

I have spent a large portion of the last few years photographing African leopards (Panthera pardus) and the more time I spend with them, quite simply, the more I have become enamored of them…


To see read about my latest favourite leopard shot click here...


 

The Lilac Breasted Roller (CorociaScaudata) is surely one of Africa’s most attractive birds and it is said to sport a variety of no fewer than seven different colours. Every wildlife photographer likes to have a prized roller shot in his or her collection and for some reason I did not yet have mine...


Click here to read more...


For me, the image of a big male lion in a tall dark forest, conjures up thoughts of an ultimate and wild Africa...

Read more about one my favourite images here...



Read about one of the most surreal experiences I have had as a wildlife photographer.

See the image and read the story here...

This is one of my all time favourite images and really, I played a very small part in creating it.

Read more here...

 Boomslangs are shy creatures but their bite requires a unique and rare antivenom, so please don’t try this at home.

Read more here...
Looking back at my 2010 calendar, I took 41 flights over 26 safaris and spent almost 1500 hours in the field. It was a bumper year filled with many highlights. Here I share with you a few of my favourite African wildlife photography images from 2010.

To view my personal favourite images from 2010, click here....


I have titled this fine art nature photography collection 'Authentic Africa' and it is a special collection in that I have selected my personal favourite images of all time! A photographer seldom gets to select his own images whether it be for an exhibit or for a publication, as editors and galleries most times make the final decision of what goes in. This collection however, was selected by myself with no other purpose but to share with you the images that I hold close to my heart.

To view my personal favourite images of all time, click here...



I was recently invited to exhibit in London's world renowned National Geographic Store. The fine art wildlife photography exhibit ran over two months from July - August 2010 and was aptly titled 'Africa'. Each image and caption had to be approved by National Geographic in Washington D.C. and although it was a fine art exhibit, I had to sign a 'declaration of non manipulation' off on all the images. The gallery is just off Piccadilly Circus in Regent Street and said to receive 40 000 visitors per day.

If you missed the exhibit, you can view an online version here...

In this 'Behind the Shot' account of one of my latest images, I offer a fresh take on a familiar subject. The African wildlife photography image is accompanied by a short story giving insight into my thoughts and perceptions as an African wildlife photographer....

Click here to read more...

The month of February is the calving season on the great plains of the Serengeti. I have been keeping tabs on the migration for the last 7 years from the Masai Mara side and this year, I thought I would pay the herds a visit on the short grass plains. My goal was to capture the essence of the Serengeti and I have compiled a fine art nature photography gallery of colour, black & white, sepia images and used every lens in my bag to do so...

Click here to view images from a piece I have titled 'Classic Serengeti'...


The food throughout the safari was exquisite but perhaps none more so than at Lagoon Camp, where additional protein was added to the dinner table in the form of flying ants. Who will ever forget my bush-whacking friend, Shem, walking nonchalantly over to the dinning table, grabbing a flying ant off a lantern and gulping it down with a look of glee upon his face?


I recently spent some time photographing pelicans. After shooting hundreds of frames, I have selected just three to publish. Here you can read why I made the selections that I did in a short piece I like to call the 'Pelican Brief'



For many years now, I have been trying to successfully capture an image of the critically endangered Black Rhino. These prehistoric beasts are not only globally threatened but are also of shy demeanor, inhabiting dense forests and thickets. On a recent fine art wildlife photography safari to Kenya my hopes were indeed high but soon to be dashed...


I am fortunate enough to have spent a couple years living and working up in Maasai-land, Kenya. Claire and I managed a community owned eco-lodge called Shompole (www.shompole.com). More recently I took a private photographic trip to northern Namibia, where I befriended a young Himba boy and learnt about his culture firsthand. In a picture essay titled 'Beautiful People', I share images of both cultures and address some rather difficult subjects, pertaining to both anthropology and conservation.







I once read a now obscure book or article on success. It advised that one should take time to reflect on the successes along life’s path no matter how big or small they may be. Seemingly, by way of cerebral osmosis, this notion was archived in my long-term memory. Now, years later, two recent achievements cause me to take a moment and reflect on my career as a wildlife photographer…




I recently entered the BBC Nature Writer of the Year competition (just for fun). I am lazy with my writing and decided to take on the challenge of writing a true life account of an 'animal encounter'. Over the years I have had many delightful moments with Hippo and in this short story, I expand on one such special meeting. The catch? I only had 500 words to do it in!

'Blood, Sweat and Photographic Tears'
An article written explaining my endeavours to capture on film - wild nomadic lion in Kenya's southern Rift Valley.

'Maasai-land'
A letter written to my brother-in-law containing a few excerpts from my journal and detailing life in Maaisa-land.

'The Roof is too High'
An African wildlife photography letter detailing a close encounter with lion during a dust storm.


'Andrew's Close Call'
A journal entry detailing a friend of ours who had an encounter of the lion kind when deciding to visit my African wildlife photography hide to do some birdwatching?

'Flamingo Woes'
A letter written detailing the exploits of an African wildlife photographer in and around Lake Natron

'Lake Natron'
A detailed article documenting one of the most dynamic landforms on planet earth.


'Warrior Shoot'
A letter detailing a 'behind the scenes' look into a unique shoot that took place the Natron slat falts.

'Waterhole Bliss'
An African photography blog - behind the scenes update from Kenya



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